A Change of Habit

group of students

I heard on a radio show the most abominable reason that a husband left his wife.  It wasn’t an affair, it wasn’t a lack of emotional satisfaction in the relationship.

She cut her hair. Yes. You read that right.

She is not the woman I married, he declared. I fell in love with her long tresses, the wonderful cascade of hair running down her back. This is who I married all those years ago. I don’t want to be married to a woman with short hair. It went on and on as the radio presenters seemed both horrified and advisory in equal measure.

Yet can a small change really have such a measurable impact? Can it seriously change the foundations of a relationship? Even the teaching and learning relationship?

A study from 2017 by Rands and Gansemer-Topf looked at how changing the physical space of a classroom can create a more active learning environment. The study revealed that by redesigning a classroom in Iowa State University, it led to a more active learning environment, where students were more engaged and questioning.  The study recorded feedback on case studies and focus groups to examine how the redesign of the classroom (from a traditional/teacher centered rows) to one more fitting to group work (tables in a circle, big portable white boards for group learning, etc). In other words – the students had to do things and think about things rather than sitting back and letting the teacher perform while they whiled away the duration of the class imagining the perfect tweet to compose to guy or girl who had caught their eye.

It seems to be a common methodology nowadays for the teacher – primary school and at all levels – to change around the groups they work with each day.  In our centre in Mountjoy Square, we try to mix it up as best we can – change tutor, change methodology, change seating arrangements. This practice came out of the more general shift in educational practice from  ‘how teachers teach’ to ‘how students learn’. The more archaic classroom – the rows and linear seating was of course about control but also assumed everyone learns in the same way. What I refer to as the ‘Miss Trunchbull classroom’ – completely non democratic, completely controlling.

I believe there is a lot to be said for changing the classroom space around:

  • It moves students out of their comfort zone
  • It encourages better participation
  • It harnesses better independence
  • It helps to create a variety of learning methodologies (group work, discussion, paired work)
  • It gets students engaged in talking about what they are learning

 

It is a good idea to think about the set up of our classroom – does it make students move around?  Does it make them get more involved? Does it make them have to chat to the student beside them and think about what they are learning and do things?

They say change is the only certainty in life. The same must go for teaching approaches, this I am sure off. Yet there still remains silly husbands who don’t like their wives getting their hair cut and we can’t do much about that.

For more reading on the study by Rands and Gansemer-Topf: 

Click to access e99b6a144d7eeb1a31657710492768bb4872.pdf

 

old classroom

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