A New Tutor Takes A Trip Down Memory Lane

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Seeing the first year students come into the centre this week as part of their B.SC in Education Studies course brings back a flood of memories.  I know exactly how they feel, the apprehension before you go up the steps to the building, worrying that you won’t enjoy it, and thinking, ‘Will the students like me?’ ‘How will I know what room to go to?’ and ‘I hope I don’t have a class on the top floor!’ These are thoughts that ran through my mind on the first day six years ago but I was reassured once I came to reception and was warmly greeted by all the staff and students and was put at ease almost instantly!
In first year I became immersed in the classes and got the most out of the week and truly loved the experience. Spelling, Maths, Computers and ESOL, I really found a learning environment I could see myself working in in the future. Though I only got a taster in those few short days, I really got a feel for the incredible work that is done each day in the centre. The staff, the students and the welcoming, homely atmosphere that DALC brought, set the standard for my upcoming placements.
In my final year, when we were given the opportunity to do our eight week placement in an educational setting of our choosing, I immediately knew where I wanted to go. I got in touch with DALC once again to organise it and luckily I was given the chance to experience in a fuller sense, the teaching and learning approach that I admire about the centre. I was adamant I was going to get the best out of the 8 weeks.
Throughout my placement, I was fully immersed in the classes and jumped right into the deep end when asked would I be willing to prepare classes independently once I found my feet and gained the confidence. The staff were extremely helpful and always went out of their way to ensure my experience was a positive one and were always there to listen to any worries or concerns I might have had.

However, it was the students who made each class so enjoyable. I was inspired by each of their stories, by how they returned to learning for all different reasons, whether it was for personal, family or work. Each class was so different and I loved it.

I could see the students growing in confidence in the smallest of challenges and tasks that were assigned to them and the sense of pride I felt at how much of an impact one can make in a group. The students were learning from the lessons I facilitated and equally they were teaching me things that can’t be scribbled down in a lesson plan.
Being in DALC for those eight weeks set in stone the type of work I could see myself doing upon completion of my degree. I loved the values that were seen and respected by both staff and student; learner-centred, being respectful of the adult status of the learner, instilling creativity and confidence. I wanted to use these values in my future career as an educator.
I continued to volunteer in a number of classes when I finished my placement and it was a great break from college and those final year blues!
The rest is history I suppose, and six years later I find myself working in DALC and doing a job which I absolutely love. Every day is different and I am learning new things every day. I am forever grateful for the opportunity to experience DALC back in my college years. It carved my future and I hope that these young students make the most out of every day they are here. You never know, they might find themselves working in this field of education down the road!

By Kate Fox, Assistant CE Supervisor and Tutor, DALC  

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Tutors of Mountjoy Square: Antoinette

antoinette

Antoinette has been a tutor in DALC for 10 years. She has a wealth of experience, knowledge and insight into what learning is. She is passionate about learning and wants to share her knowledge about its transformative power.  She teaches maths, ESOL and spelling with a focus on phonics.

Listen to her thoughts and her vision for what makes a good tutor and what learning and education really means for her. She begins by telling us her inspirational and insightful story below:

Antoinette’s Story:

 

 

What makes a good tutor:

 

 

What education or learning means: